If You Cut it too Close, You Need to Cut it out

The world of BDSM and kink is such a diverse place. It includes many forms of play. Techniques like spanking and bondage are well known. Knife play is thought of as a riskier sort of play. And through this risk, it is possibly one of the sexiest things to do with your other half. You are literally living on the edge if, and when you engage in knife play.

Wikipedia defines blade play as

Knife play is a form of consensual BDSM edgeplay involving knives, daggers, and swords as a source of physical and mental stimulation. Knives are typically used to cut away clothing, scratch the skin, remove wax after wax play, or simply provide sensual stimulation.

I would like to thank the owner of twohandsmade.com for donating me the two awesome damascus steel blades shown in this article.

Risque or Risky?

As any of my fellow educators will tell you, nothing is without risk. In fact, the act of brushing your teeth could possibly be lethal. But playing with knives brings with it a certain amount of risk. However, properly educating yourself about knives and knife play will ensure that you will be able to play safely, sanely and with limited risks.

“You are the knife I turn inside myself; that is love. That my dear is love.”
– Franz Kafka

You do need to realize however that knife play is classified as edge play*, how edgy knife play is has been a discussion that has been going on for many years and you need to be aware of the risks involved as well as any scenarios you might encounter.

This guide can be your starting point, it is in no way the definitive guide to knife play, and I would advise you to find an experienced knife player in your local community to help you out (most of them are very willing to teach) when you want to put the theory into practice.

*In BDSM, edgeplay is a subjective term for types of activities that are “on” or “over” the edge of the boundaries of Safe, Sane and Consensual. These activities are regarded by many as inadvisable and dangerous, and best practices indicate that they should not be attempted without proper and extensive training, supervision, safety precautions, etc. as appropriate, and never without thorough negotiations.

Chance favors the prepared mind

Talk the Talk Before you Walk the Walk

As in any kind of kinky play, the first step in wanting to engage in knife play with your partner is preparation.

We’ll get to the “gear” part of this later on in this article.

But to start off with, you and your partner need to talk and discuss what will potentially happen during play, and more importantly the things that should not happen during play.

Knife play can be a form of fear play. So it’s crucial to discuss any mental issues. For example, does your partner have any bad experiences with knives? Is there a trauma that he/she might be aware of? Are there any physiological issues that might be relevant?

Naturally, also discuss physical aspects. If someone has a condition where blood might not clot correctly or is susceptible to badly healing wounds, playing with sharp items might not be the smartest of moves. I think you get the gist of what I am telling you here.

One last thing though: Never should you ever engage in knife play when you or your partner are under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Not only will this potentially “thin” your blood, but in this kind of play, you need to be sound of mind: before, during and after.

Respect

Hand-made knives for knife playI myself am a bit of a knife-nerd and have been ever since I was 7, obsessed with things sharp and made of steel. I was in absolute bliss when I got my first pocket knife from my parents at the age of 10. As superstition dictates, I had to pay them a penny for it though. Giving someone a knife would be bad luck.

This taught me to respect the knives I wield, and up to this day respect, not fear of knives is what I think makes me able to use a knife responsibly.

The Stuff of Legends

A well-known misconception of knife play is that you need to use a large knife. If you are old as I am, you might remember the Crocodile Dundee scene where Dundee is held up by a “gang” with a stiletto, and then says “That’s not a knife, that’s a knife” and pulls a 20-inch bowie knife on the gang, causing them to run away in fear, and justifiably so.

If you’re now going: Stiletto? Bowie knife? Keep reading and I will get to that in a bit.

So a big knife? Not when you’re starting out, especially as being able to control the knife is of paramount importance.

Keep in mind, your mothers paring knife isn’t up to the job either.

Time for Some Actual Knife Play

So you’ve talked, and you are certain you want to do some knife play. Now what?

Gear up!

Knife play blade with submissive statueAs I mentioned before using a knife you can control is key. This means not too heavy, not to light, preferably well balanced. And believe it or not, as sharp as you can get it.
Also if you use a foldable blade, make sure it locks. Not so much for the safety of the receiver, but certainly for the giver, if your sharp knife folds in on itself while you are holding it, you will get hurt and we wouldn’t want that.

Also get a knife that you will only use for knife play. Of course, you have a cool camping knife or something like that, but it is never clean enough to be used on someone’s skin.

Recommended Knife

First of all, make sure that the knife you have in mind is legal in your part of the world.
To start off with I’d recommend a fixed blade knife, about 5 to 6 inches total length, with about a 3-inch blade that is sharp on one side and dull on the other. This makes the knife still pretty impressive (mind play) and very controllable for the wielder. Your first knife is all about function and not about pretty, pretty will come later.

There’s more stuff you need to know about hygiene and storing. Stay tuned for part two!

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.